Blogstitute 2017: What Do They Remember?

July 27th, 2017

As you think about starting the new school year, hold tight to this message from Jennifer Allen, author of Becoming a Literacy Leader: “as teachers, as literacy leaders, we have the power to make difference through our interactions and interest in others.” Who knows what your students will remember you for?

Jen Allen - 2016What Do They Remember? How Do We Make Them Feel?
Jennifer Allen

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”
– Maya Angelou

Hello, 

I was one of your third grade students many, many years ago. I am currently a grad student at the University of San Francisco, studying Education for Social Justice. We’re doing a project on an inspirational teacher, and I’m doing mine about you. It inspired me to reach out to you. Sally

This is the message I found in my inbox this summer.  As soon as I saw Sally’s name, I found myself smiling. The image of Sally, an eight-year-old girl with blond curls, freckles, and an infectious smile, filled my head. I had not seen or heard from Sally for more than twenty years.

After a few e -mail exchanges this summer,  Sally sent another e-mail, this time with a link to the video project that she had created around her inspirational teacher—me.  I wondered what I could have possibly said or done to be remembered as an inspiration.  I clicked the link and watched Sally talk about me on camera.  I watched, holding my breath.  I was relieved that I made her feel special. I didn’t remember the specifics of the black dress that she spoke of on camera. It made me realize that as teachers we often don’t know what sticks to one’s heart.

We spend so much time these days in schools focusing in on curriculum, assessments, and professional development that at times it’s easy to lose sight of that what’s most important—the people in the buildings, the students, and the adults that we interact with each day.  What will really be remembered at the end of the day, school year, or even years later?  What is it that we keep and why? I remember listening to a keynote presentation years ago from educator Jonathon Kozal. What I remember from that presentation was a statement that he made regarding standards—that no student is ever going to remember that on Tuesday they learned standard number 3, just because it was written on the board. His words were a reminder that our students are more than a standard charted on a board.

Susan Scott writes in her book Fierce Conversations, “Our emotional wake determines the story that is told about each of us in the organization. It’s the story that’s told when we’re not in the room. It’s the story that will be told about us after we’re gone.” My e-mail exchanges with Sally remind me of the importance of my interactions with students and adults on a daily basis. The video is a reminder that I don’t really know what one holds on to or keeps over time.  But what I do know is that as teachers, as literacy leaders, we have the power to make difference through our interactions and interest in others. We have a responsibility to be present, to listen, and be aware of how our words may or may not make others feel. So as we start a new year with new students and staff, what power will your words hold, what stories will they feed.

 

Entry Filed under: Blogstitute

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Stephanie Affinito  |  July 27th, 2017 at 10:56 am

    This was such a beautiful post and video. Thank you for the reminder of the power we have to make our students feel connected to someone and special. It reminded me of a Ted Talk by Drew Dudley about everyday leadership and creating ‘lollypop’ moments to help others feel valued. You might enjoy it!

    https://www.ted.com/talks/drew_dudley_everyday_leadership

    Stephanie Affinito
    Department of Literacy Teaching and Learning
    University at Albany, NY

  • 2. Jennifer Allen  |  July 28th, 2017 at 6:09 am

    I love this video! I have used it to launch pd sessions. It never gets old. It’s a great reminder the impact our words can have on others.

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