See you at NCSM and NCTM

We will be in San Francisco next week for NCSM and NCTM. Stop by our booth (204 and 932, respectively), to meet some of our authors and receive 25% off our books and videos and to pick up one of our fancy tote bags!

Lucy West will be signing at the NCSM bookstore at 1 p.m. Monday, April 11, then later that afternoon at 4 p.m. at the Stenhouse booth. You can preview her latest video Adding Talk to the Equation here.

At NCTM you can catch up with Jessica Shumway at 11 a.m.  and with Lucy West at 1 p.m. on Thursday, April 14.

Friday is also ShadowCon time, starting at 5 p.m. For details, follow #shadowcon16 on Twitter. Our own Tracy Zager will be there, so be sure to say hello to her!

 

 

 

Add comment April 9th, 2016

What if you weren’t afraid of math?

The majority of elementary school teachers had negative experiences as math students, and many continue to dislike or avoid mathematics as adults. In her inspiring speech at ShadowCon during this year’s NCTM conference in Boston, Tracy Zager asked the audience to look at how we can better understand and support our colleagues, so they can reframe their personal relationships with math and teach better than they were taught.

Tracy is the author of the upcoming book Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had: Ideas and Strategies from Vibrant Classrooms (to be published in 2016 by Stenhouse Publishers). She also works with schools as a coach/consultant, and loves learning together with teachers and students over time. Watch a video of her speech below and then read her calls to action and see what you can implement in your school/classroom.

Call to Action

  • This is a collection of words mathematicians’ use when they talk about mathematics. Discuss it with your colleagues, making an extra effort to include everyone.
  • Each person should choose a word that appeals most to him or her. It should be a word that’s not currently a big part of your math teaching and learning, but you wish it were.
  • Using your colleagues as resources and collaborators, make the word you chose central to the planning, teaching, and learning of your next lesson. Don’t skimp on the conversation with your team–that’s part of the point!
  • Teach the lesson. Afterwards, get back together with your colleagues and talk about it. What was different for each of you? What was different for your students?
  • If it works for you, consider sharing the image and exploring it with your students as well. There are lots of possibilities here.
  • Write a few paragraphs here so we can learn together. Describe what happened and what you learned. What ideas do you and your colleagues have for building on this exercise?

Add comment June 9th, 2015

Watch Two Talks from ShadowCon

If you missed the excitement and buzz of ShadowCon — the alternative, teacher-led mini-conference during NCTM — here is your chance to revisit all of the speeches and calls to action. We are excited to post one speech here from one of our own authors, Elham Kazemi, who, along with Allison Hintz, wrote Intentional Talk. The second speech is by Laila Nur, who encourages math teachers to bring humor into their classroooms. You can find out more about ShadowCon and see how other teachers are implementing the calls to action on their website.

Elham Kazemi

Call to Action from Elham:

My call to action is for you to make collective learning opportunities happen by doing the following:

  • Find two teacher friends or more (over time, your principal would be a strategic bonus). Take something you want to try from this conference, from a book, from the math twitter blogosphere. But don’t try it out alone. Explain the idea of owning the lesson together and set some norms for collaboration and risk taking.
  • Plan together and identify some questions you have about your students. Then teach together, while you sit among your students. Call teacher time outs during the lesson that let you pursue ideas, shift direction, or experiment with a next good question.
  • Share back with us what you tried and what you learned from this new way of making practice public and learning together.

Laila Nur

Call to Action from Laila:

Incorporate mathematical and/or educational humor into your class at least once a week for the next four weeks (or longer). Then:

  • Describe how you implemented humor into your lesson/class time.
  • How comfortable did you feel during implementation?
  • Take note of changes in students’ behavior and attitude over time. How did students respond?
  • Do students seem more confident or comfortable speaking in front of a group?

Add comment May 12th, 2015

Six calls to action at Shadowcon

We are excited to have a guest blogger today: David Wees is a math teacher in NYC and he recounts Shadowcon — the alternative NCTM conference  — for us.

Six calls to action at Shadowcon

Imagine six engaging speakers, each with ten minutes to convince you to make a specific change in your teaching. At the end of the night, you select which change you want to work toward, and ideally you take action. So describes the experiment in professional learning called Shadowcon, hatched by Dan Meyer, Zak Champagne, and Michael Flynn and shared for the first time at the NCTM Annual Meeting in Boston.

Kicking off the night was Tracy Zager, a mathematics educator who lives in Maine. Tracy shared with us her heartbreaking story of working with elementary school preservice teachers, a majority of whom have negative feelings about mathematics. She described how these feelings were very likely caused by the early experiences in mathematics and how too often these teachers use the same teaching practices that caused their own math anxiety, creating a generational cycle of fear of mathematics. Tracy called on all of us to break the cycle by opening conversations about our experiences with mathematics in school and to start closing the gap between school math and the way mathematicians experience math.

tracy

Next up was Elham Kazemi, a teacher-educator at the University of Washington. As part of her work, Elham collaborates with teams of elementary school teachers. Elham asked this thought-provoking question: “What would it look like if we designed schools to be places where teachers learn together alongside their students?” Teaching is complex work! Elham suggested that trying to learn how to do it alongside a colleague is best. Her call to action: Plan together, rehearse together, enact together, reflect together, and everyone improves together.

elham

Laila Nur, a high school math teacher in Los Angeles, California, spoke about how she realized that her students talked much differently outside her class than within it, and decided to experiment with humor in her class as an antidote. Her takeaway from this experiment is that when kids laugh together and with their teacher, it helps break down some of the negative feelings associated with math. Her students enjoy class much more and consequently have fewer emotional barriers to learning mathematics. Her call to action is to incorporate humor in our classrooms, at least four times, and to see how that affects our students.
laila

Kristin Gray, a fifth-grade teacher and math specialist, described how she pays attention to student thinking as evidenced by what they say and what they write and then journals what she notices. This stems from her genuine curiosity about her students’ mathematical thinking. She asked three questions, “What are you GENUINELY CURIOUS about in the content you teach and how you teach it?” “What are you GENUINELY CURIOUS about in your students’ math conversations?” and “What are you GENUINELY CURIOUS about in the math work your students do each day?” Her call to action was for us to start a math journal and record our reflections about our students’ work and to share how this affects our teaching.

kristin

Christopher Danielson, a mathematics educator in St Paul, Minnesota, started by sharing a pair of stories with essentially the same moral: listen to your students. In the first story Christopher realized he had not heard something a student said and that the difference between what he heard and what was said was small but incredibly important. He also noticed that sometimes when we aren’t listening to students very well we can hear things and make assumptions about how they understand the world that just aren’t true. He implored the audience to ask follow-up questions when they think they understand what a student means, and then to share our reflections on any differences we notice between what we thought we heard and what the students actually meant.

christopher

The final speaker of the night was Michael Pershan, a mathematics teacher living in New York City. Michael has spent much of his career thinking about the mistakes students make and what they mean. He has also spent much of this past year thinking about the feedback teachers give students and how we can make this feedback more useful. He described four potential pitfalls of the hints we give, and offered us the final challenge of the night: to plan our hints in advance and then share the ones that worked so that we can collectively build a pool of effective hints to give to students when they are stuck in specific areas of mathematics.

michael

The six speakers, with their six calls to action, were inspiring. It made me reflect on how I can incorporate their ideas into my own practice. Of the six calls to action, I will start with Elham’s proposal and find someone with whom to plan, rehearse, enact, and reflect on my lessons so that I work in less isolation.

Which call to action are you going to choose? You can see what others are doing on the Shadowcon website.

1 comment April 28th, 2015

The buzz of math

We just got back from the annual NCTM conference in Boston where we got to meet many of you — our readers and our authors. We had a lot going on this year with a busy booth, several of our authors giving presentations, as well as ShadowCon, where a group of passionate math teachers issued calls to action to their colleagues and to the next generation of teachers. We’ll be following up with them in the next couple of weeks and months, but until then here are some tweets that represent some of the excitement, learning, and enthusiasm of this year’s NCTM. (You have to click on some of the images to see the full text and image in the tweet!)

Add comment April 20th, 2015

See you at NCSM and NCTM

We are heading down to Boston this weekend for NCSM and then NCTM. We hope to see you at our booth at both conferences!
Here are the details about author signings and sessions at each event:

NCSM

(Stenhouse booth #103)

Author signings:
Chris Moynihan, 10:00 a.m. Tuesday
Elham Kazemi, 11:30 a.m. Tuesday
Cathy Humphreys & Ruth Parker, 3:30 p.m. Tuesday

Author sessions:
Ruth Parker, 2:45-3:45 Monday: “Enacting the CCSS: Preparing a Next Generation of Mathematics Teacher Leaders”
Elham Kazemi, 3:00-3:45 Monday: Hot Topics Conversation Café: “Developing a School-wide Learning and Coaching Culture” (Table 3)
Elham Kazemi, 10:00-11:00 Tuesday: “Developing a School-Wide Culture of Collective Risk Taking and Learning: It’s Not Easy But Why It’s Worth It”
Cathy Humphreys, 2:15-3:15 Tuesday: “High School Number Talks as Agents of Change in Classroom Culture”
Chris Moynihan, 2:15-3:15 Wednesday: “Reflecting the Light of Learning Through the Mathematical Practices: Finding the GOLD within the MPs”

NCTM
(Stenhouse booth #721)

Author signings:
Chris Moynihan, Noon Thursday
Kassia Omohundro Wedekind, 12:30 p.m., Friday
Elham Kazemi & Allison Hintz, 2:00 p.m., Friday
Anne Collins and Linda Dacey, 4:15 p.m., Friday
Ruth Parker, 11:00 a.m. Saturday

Author Sessions:
Linda Dacey, 8:00-9:00 Thursday: “Sing; Move; Dramatize; Create Stories, Visuals, and Poems: Learn Math”
Elham Kazemi, Kassia Omohundro Wedekind & Allison Hintz, 1:00-2:15 Thursday: “Counting Matters: Why We Should Pay More Attention to Counting”*
Kassia Omohundro Wedekind, 2:00-3:00 Thursday: “Pulling Together to Promote Innovative Practices: A K-College Partnership”*
Kassia Omohundro Wedekind, 11:00-12:00 Friday: Transforming Intervention: Moving from Skills Remediation to Rich Problem Solving”
Elham Kazemi & Allison Hintz, 12:30-1:30 Friday: “Transforming Practice: Organizing Schools for Meaningful Teacher and Leader Learning”
Anne Collins, 2:45-4:00 Friday: “Modeling Concepts Across the Domains”
Ruth Parker, 9:30-10:30 Saturday: “Bringing the Standards for Mathematical Practice to Life in Classrooms”
Allison Hintz, 11:00-12:00 Saturday: “Mathematizing Children’s Books”

Add comment April 11th, 2015

Snapshots from NCTM

In case you missed the action last week at NCTM, here are a few snapshots of our math authors who spent time at the Stenhouse booth with fans.

Debbie Diller signs a bag for one very happy fan

From the left: Jessica Shumway, math editor Toby Gordon, Anne Collins, and Linda Dacey

Debbie Diller (left) and Jessica Shumway get to know each other

Jessica signs her book Number Sense Routines

Add comment April 19th, 2011


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