See you at NCSM and NCTM

We are looking forward to seeing you at this year’s NCSM and NCTM conferences in San Antonio.

At NCSM we will be exhibiting our books at booth #404.

At NCTM you can find us at booth #1325. Stop by to meet our authors:

Thursday
9:30-10: Anne Collins (Accessible Algebra)
10-10:30: Lucy West (Adding Talk to the Equation)
11:30-Noon: Chris Moynihan (Math Sense)
12:30-1: Mike Flynn (Beyond Answers)
1-1:30: Jessica Shumway (Number Sense Routines)
1:30-2: Nancy Anderson (What’s Right About Wrong Answers)
3-3:30: Christopher Danielson (Which One Doesn’t Belong?)

Friday
10-10:30: Chris Confer (Small Steps, Big Changes)
11-11:30: Kassia Omohundro Wedekind  (Math Exchanges)
3-3:30: Tracy Zager (Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had)

Stop by at both conferences to browse and purchase our latest titles, pick up our free tote bag, and for a chance to win $1,000 in Stenhouse titles! Download a full schedule of Stenhouse authors presenting at both conferences.

Add comment March 31st, 2017

Stenhouse author workshops near you

Catch one of your Stenhouse authors at a workshop or conference near you!

State of Maryland International Reading Association Council Annual Conference
March 29-31
Jeff Anderson * Jennifer Roberts * Lee Ann Spillane * Julie Ramsay

NCSM Annual Conference
April 3
San Antonio, TX
Lucy West * Tracy Zager * Mike Flynn * Nancy Anderson * Ruth Parker * Cathy Humphreys * Chris Moynihan * Allison Hintz.

NCTM Annual Conference
April 5
San Antonio, TX
Anne Collins * Linda Dacey * Lucy West *  Christopher Danielson *  Mike Flynn * Elham Kazemi * Chris Confer * Chris Moynihan * Kassia Omohundro Wedekind * Jessica Shumway * Tracy Zager * Nancy Anderson

Massachusetts Reading
April 6
Jeff Anderson * Steven Layne * Clare Landrigan & Tammy Mulligan * Katie Cunningham * Jennifer Jacobson

Gail Boushey and Joan Moser, “The 2 Sisters”
April 22, San Jose, CA: Daily 5 and Math Daily 3 Frameworks
April 23, San Jose, CA: CAFE: Assessment to Instruction
May 6, Chicago, IL: Daily 5 and Math Daily 3 Frameworks
May 7: Chicago, IL: CAFE: Assessment to Instruction

For more dates through the summer in Orlando, Denver, Tacoma, Pittsburgh, and other cities, visit: http://www.the2sisters.com/Workshops.html

Stephanie Harvey
May 17
Allen, TX
“Content Literacy Lessons for Comprehension Toolkits”

Jan Burkins & Kim Yaris
May 23
Ramapo College, Mahwah, NJ
“How should I teach reading next year?”

Debbie Diller
May 24 & 25
Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO
“Growing Independent Literacy Learners”

Debbie Diller’s Summer Institute
July 14 & 15
Houston, TX
“Growing Independent Readers, Writers, and Thinkers with Debbie Diller”

Shawna Coppola
New Hampshire Literacy Institute
July 31-August 4
“Writing, Redefined: Honoring the Compositional Work of ALL Students”

Add comment March 28th, 2017

Now Online: Accessible Algebra

Accessible AlgebraAccessible Algebra is for any pre-algebra or algebra teacher who wants to provide a rich and fulfilling experience to students as they develop new ways of thinking through and about algebra.

Each of the thirty lessons in this book identifies and addresses a focal domain and standard in algebra, then lays out the common misconceptions and challenges students may face as they work to investigate and understand problems.

Authors Anne Collins and Steven Benson describe classroom scenarios in each lesson and also suggest ways teachers may assign a problem or activity, how to include formative assessment strategies, and suggestions for grouping students.

Each lesson includes sections on how to support struggling students as well as additional resources and readings.

We just posted the full preview online!

Add comment March 27th, 2017

Empower your teaching by being a teacher-writer

The Tenth Annual Slice of Life Challenge kicks of March 1 and in this guest blog post Stacey Shubitz, cofounder of the Two Writing Teachers website, argues that to become an effective writing teacher, teachers need to be writers themselves. Stacey is the author of Craft Moves: Lesson Sets for Teaching Writing with Mentor Texts

Empower your teaching by being a teacher-writer
Stacey Shubitz

stacey_croppedMy daughter is adjusting to full-day kindergarten this year. Like many kids her age, she is exhausted when she comes home. As a result, we pulled her out of ballet and tap classes—she wanted to chill after a seven-and-a-half-hour school day rather than attend dance classes.

My husband and I searched for a Sunday afternoon activity because we wanted her to have an extracurricular interest. A friend suggested aerial arts class. The idea of my daughter hanging upside down and swinging from a piece of fabric scared me. The first thing I did was check the instructor’s qualifications. Upon researching, I learned the instructor had been performing and teaching aerial arts for nearly a decade. I wasn’t convinced I’d keep our daughter enrolled past the trial class, but the teacher’s experience was enough to let my daughter try it.

Once we arrived at the trial course, the teacher demonstrated everything she wanted the children to do before they did it. She talked about what might be challenging. She spotted the kids as they tried different poses in the fabric. She repositioned their hands, supported their bodies (when necessary), and encouraged them with supportive words. As a result of her expertise as an aerial artist and a teacher, I enrolled my daughter in weekly classes.

Just as teachers of aerials need to be proficient aerial artists, teachers who lead writing workshops should be writers themselves. I never would have enrolled my daughter in the aerials class if the instructor wasn’t a proficient aerial artist herself. Similarly, I believe writing regularly plays a role in becoming an exemplary writing teacher.

If you want to be the best teacher of writing you can possibly be, there are a few things you must do: read high-quality professional books, attend professional development about writing, surround yourself with colleagues who will study student writing alongside you, and do a lot of your own writing. If you’re not sure how to get started with your own writing, please join my colleagues and me for the 10th Annual Slice of Life Story Challenge on Two Writing Teachers.  SOLSC

The Slice of Life Story Challenge began on Two Writing Teachers in 2008. The online challenge’s mission is to support teachers who want to develop and sustain a daily writing habit. Over the years, the challenge has created a community of teacher-writers who are better able to support the students they serve in writing workshops. Teachers are invited to write a slice of life story—an anecdotal piece of writing about a small part of one’s day—on their own blogs and then share the link to their story on our blog. Each person who leaves a link to his or her own blog visits at least three other people’s blogs to comment on their slice-of-life writing.

I believe being a writer is one of the biggest gifts you can give to your students. Being a teacher-writer means you can confer with your students and feel a special kind of camaraderie. Being a teacher-writer means you understand the struggles and frustrations as well as the triumphs and the beauty. Being a teacher-writer means you will transform your students’ lives because you believe in the power of words. It is my hope that all children who take part in writing workshops will have teacher-writers.

I hope you’ll join us for the 10th Annual Slice of Life Story Challenge this March. We are a welcoming community of teacher-writers—at varying points in our careers—who come together to share blog posts about the ordinary moments in our lives. Click here to find out how to join our community of writers.

 

Stacey Shubitz is an independent literacy consultant, an adjunct professor, and a former elementary school teacher. She’s the author of Craft Moves: Lesson Sets for Teaching Writing with Mentor Texts and the coauthor of Day by Day: Refining Writing Workshop Through 180 Days of Reflective Practice. She blogs at Two Writing Teachers and can be found on Twitter @sshubitz.

Add comment February 15th, 2017

7 new titles available for preview

We just posted the full preview for seven new and recent books from our Canadian partner, Pembroke Publishers.

Powerful Readers
Thinking Strategies to Guide Literacy Instruction in Secondary Classrooms
Kyla Hadden and Adrienne Gear
At any age or grade level, powerful readers are those who are aware of their thinking as they read. This book demonstrates that instruction in the key strategies of connecting, visualizing, questioning, inferring, determining importance, and transforming can help high school students develop their reading skills and get more out of their work with fiction and nonfiction.
Grades 8-12 • 128 pages • $24.00 • Available now

Literacy 101
Questions and Answers That Meet the Needs of Real Teachers
David Booth
In his new book, David Booth answers questions from real teachers about building skills in literacy—from phonics to comprehension, from simple exercises to rich reading materials. Drawing on more than forty years of experience in education, David shares hard-learned lessons about what has—and hasn’t—worked for him.
Grades K-12 • 128 pages • $24.00 • Available now

Student Diversity, Third Edition
Teaching Strategies to Meet the Learning Needs of All Students in K-10 Classrooms
Faye Brownlie, Catherine Feniak, and Leyton Schnellert
Based on extensive classroom research, Student Diversity presents many examples of teachers working together in diverse classrooms to improve their teaching practice—from the primary and early years to middle school and high school.
Grades K-10 • 160 pages • $24.00 • Available now

Substitute Teaching?
Everything You Need to Get the Students on Your Side and Teach Them, Too
Amanda Yuill
This easy-to-read, humorous survival guide for substitute teachers presents strategies to get students on your side and make classroom management easier for the whole day. You’ll get ready-to-use tools, tips, and lesson ideas for every grade from kindergarten through 8th.
Grades K-8 • 160 pages • $24.00 • Available now

The Four Roles of the Numerate Learner
Effective Teaching and Assessment Strategies to Help Students Think Differently About Mathematics
Mary Fiore and Maria Luisa Lebar
This book introduces a framework (sense maker, skill user, thought communicator, and critical interpreter) that supports an integrated approach to effective mathematics instruction. It builds on educators’ understanding of how to effectively teach mathematics and borrows from successful frameworks used to teach literacy.
Grades K-12 • 128 pages • $24.00 • Available now

Relationships Make the Difference
Connect with Your Students and Help Them Build Social, Emotional, and Academic Skills
Pat Trottier
This book provides the scaffolding that teachers need to establish strong relationships with their students and create caring classroom communities that build relationships with parents, school administration, staff, and support specialists.
Grades K-12 • 128 pages • $24.00 • Available now

Teaching with Humor, Compassion, and Conviction
Helping Our Students Become Literate, Considerate, Passionate Human Beings
Heather Hollis
How can teachers make their literacy classrooms a place of joy? Full of simple strategies and activities for building community, this practical book is committed to promoting strong literacy skills and creating mindful classrooms where students are free to speak with compassion, write with conviction, and read with joy.
Grades K-6 • 128 pages • $24.00 • Available now

Add comment January 9th, 2017

Remembering Tom Seavey

Tom Seavey (1944-2016), co-founder of Stenhouse Publishers

tom-portraitOn Christmas Day, Tom Seavey, who founded Stenhouse with his wife, Philippa Stratton, died suddenly of a heart attack after spending a wonderful day with his family. Tom is being remembered as a loving and devoted husband, father, and grandfather, as well as an innovative and highly-regarded publisher of books for educators.

Tom helped launch Heinemann in 1978 where, together with colleague John Watson, they grew the company to become the leading publisher of professional development books for teachers. In 1980 they were joined by Philippa Stratton, Tom’s wife, who focused on finding and cultivating authors. Heinemann went on to publish several authors who would become familiar names to nearly every educator in the country–including Don Graves, Lucy Calkins, and Nancie Atwell.

In 1993, Tom and Philippa left Heinemann to start Stenhouse Publishers as a subsidiary of Highlights for Children of Columbus, Ohio. At Stenhouse, Tom and Philippa repeated the success they had had at Heinemann with a series of bestselling titles. In 2010, Philippa became the only publisher to win the Outstanding Educator Award from the National Council of Teachers of English for the body of work she and Tom had published at Heinemann and Stenhouse.

“Tom’s approach to publishing combined taste, independence, curiosity and, often, a non-traditional mode of thinking,” said Kent Johnson, CEO of Highlights for Children. “Because of his modesty, only a few people truly know the greatness of his contributions to these publishing houses and, most importantly, to educators.”

After a life of work on behalf of teachers, Tom retired in 2008. His wide-ranging interests included reading, travel, cooking, furniture-making, learning Hungarian, and volunteering at Florence House, Portland’s women’s shelter, where he helped prepare and serve lunch.

Tom is survived by Philippa and their daughter, Eliza Seavey, who is the nurse manager at Harbour Women’s Health in Portsmouth, NH. She is married to wife Jamie Stone and the couple have two children, Nora and Ben.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to Preble Street (preblestreet.org), the umbrella organization for the Florence House women’s shelter where Tom volunteered.

Tributes to Tom by Stenhouse staff members:

From Dan Tobin, president of Stenhouse:

About 11 years ago this month, my sister-in-law Toby Gordon called to tell me her old friend Tom Seavey was leaving his position as marketing manager at Stenhouse. She thought I might be interested in the job. Toby had worked with Tom and Philippa for years at Heinemann and she thought Philippa and I would make a good team at Stenhouse.

I was a big fan of what Tom and Philippa had accomplished at both Heinemann and Stenhouse so I gave Tom a call. That led to the strangest and most interesting series of job interviews I’ve ever had. At some point in the conversations, we reversed roles and I began telling Tom why I lacked the experience to fill his shoes while Tom was working to convince me I was the ideal candidate. Of course, Tom won the argument; he was very persuasive.

Where Tom, Philippa, and I connected was our common commitment to teachers. I had spent 13 years as a curriculum editor and writer at EDC, a nonprofit education research organization, and the one thing I had learned from studying decades of EDC school reform research is that the teacher is the most important variable. A mediocre curriculum in the hands of a good teacher is better than a wonderful curriculum in the hands of a mediocre teacher. In the end, it’s the skills and knowledge of the teacher that matters most.

Fortunately for me, Tom stuck around to teach me the business. He left Stenhouse to go to work for our parent company, Highlights for Children, selling international rights and he moved his desk to an empty office on our first floor. Several times each week, I would go down and sit in the rocking chair next to Tom’s desk and pepper him with questions. He was the perfect mentor—patient, wise, and clear.

Well, not always totally clear. Tom had a thick Maine accent and he sprinkled his advice with all sorts of colorful terms and expressions. The introduction to the catalog was “guff.” Good conversations were “mulch.” Pointless conversations were “chin music” and pointless guff was “flapdoodle.”

Tom was a man of strong opinions but that was coupled with endless curiosity and intense modesty. He loved to turn the spotlight on others he found to be smart and interesting—especially teachers. That’s his legacy at both Stenhouse and Heinemann.

From Toby Gordon, math and science editor:

I met Tom in June 1988, on my first day as a young editor at Heinemann. He ambled over to my desk, not bothering to introduce himself, and in his thick Maine accent—which I took as British—he started asking me questions about me and my job. I discovered over the years that this curiosity spread into all corners of his life—from his brilliant co-directing of Heinemann and then Stenhouse with Philippa, to his love for beautiful wooden furniture-making, to gourmet cooking, to  the most wide-ranging reading interests I’ve ever known. And underlying these pursuits was a down-to-earth, unpretentious spirit; always looking and commenting on the world with a particularly wry wit, Tom never ceased to amuse and amaze me.

Tom and I became good friends at work and in the world, as our young families grew up together, picnicking in Philippa and Tom’s beautiful backyard, swimming at Peak’s Island, hanging out in NYC. In our more recent years, we swapped names of doctors and mechanics.

In one of the last emails Tom sent me, he thanked me for passing on the name of one particularly gifted fix-it guy. In his typical Tom-esque style, he wrote:

“Thanks for recommending Aaron. We have decided to form a fan club. If he does everything as well as he did our bathroom, he’s a shoo-in to replace LePage [Maine’s controversial governor]. Probably could also solve the mind-body problem, find the least common denominator, and explain the rules of cricket.”

This short note says so much—why I found Tom so endearing, and why I’ll miss him so.

From Maureen Barbieri, editor:

I knew Tom as the head honcho at Heinemann during the years when I was a classroom teacher. I’d see him at the booth at NCTE conferences year after year, engaged in conversations with authors, teachers, and other school people, always interested and knowledgeable. He had great radar, much like Philippa did, when it came to scoping out new talent. When I asked Mary Ehrenworth, then a high school art history teacher, to present with me in 1999, Tom came to hear us. Later he sought me out to ask for more information on her, suspecting she’d be the new ‘it girl.’ And he was right. Of course, it wasn’t long before Mary became a Heinemann star.

As the years passed and Philippa and I became friends, I had the chance to know him socially as well, and I was impressed with his insatiable curiosity and his wonderful sense of humor. He was a reader, and he had definite opinions on things. Smart, but eager to hear what other people thought. I found him fascinating, if a bit intimidating. He had a way of looking right at you, asking the follow-up question that made you examine your premise, reconsider your point.

When I looked at Tom and Philippa I saw a true partnership. Two equals, smart, passionate, creative people making a fascinating life together. I saw affection, respect, admiration, even devotion. They seemed to get much more out of life than most people – traveling, house swapping, attending concerts and plays, reading everything, and always making time for friends. Tom’s volunteer work, quietly done, revealed another side of his character. What kind of a person shows up to sit with a hospice patient week after week and then spends time with the family as they adjust to their loss? Who makes a commitment to work in the kitchen of a homeless women’s shelter? Tom Seavey did, and for many years. A quiet example of what a life well lived can look like.

My favorite memory of Tom is from a summer day in 2015. My husband Richie had been gone for about five months, and I was having lunch at their lovely house, babbling away. I caught myself, and apologized, explaining that, since I now lived alone, I tended to ramble on whenever I got to be with people. Tom was reassuring. ‘Oh, no, don’t worry. You are welcome here,’ he said. And the thing is, I believed him.

From Zsofi McMullin, marketing content editor:

I first met Tom at the cafeteria of Maine Medical Center. I worked at the hospital at the time and received a cryptic message from the hospital’s interpreter services – a man called them looking for someone to teach him Hungarian.

That man turned out to be Tom and we met once a week for several months for Hungarian lessons. For a while I couldn’t really understand why he was trying to learn Hungarian – an impossibly difficult language – but I think he must have liked the challenge and I know that he loved the country, spending weeks in a rented flat in Budapest, sometimes transporting packages back to the U.S. for me from my mom.

We always chatted for a while after our lessons and during one of those conversations I mentioned that I didn’t particularly enjoy working at the hospital. Tom said that he knew just the right job and company for me and after a few rounds of interviews I landed at Stenhouse. That was almost 12 years ago now and I will always be grateful to him for bringing me into the Stenhouse family.

2 comments January 5th, 2017

Adieu, 2016!

Whether you are ready for 2016 to be over or not, here we are, looking ahead to an exciting 2017! But before we can look ahead, let us look back at the top blog posts for the past year. Check back with us soon for a lineup of our spring titles and more great content! Happy New Year!

Top posts for 2016:
Establishing Routines for the Writing Workshop by Stacey Shubitz
Poems, Right from the Start, by Shirley McPhillips
Why Students’ Reading Plateaus, by Jan Burkins and Kim Yaris
Wide Awake to Stories, by Katie Egan Cunningham
Finding Your Writing Tribe, by Stacey Shubitz

 

Add comment December 20th, 2016

Now Online: Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had

becoming-the-math-teacher-you-wish-youd-hadTracy invites you on a journey through this most magnificent book of stories and portraits…This book turns on its head the common misconception of mathematics as a black-and-white discipline and of being good at math as entailing ease, speed, and correctness. You will find it full of color, possibility, puzzles, and delight…let yourself be drawn in.

— Elham Kazemi from the foreword

While mathematicians describe mathematics as playful, beautiful, creative, and captivating, many students describe math class as boring, stressful, useless, and humiliating. In Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had, Tracy Zager helps teachers close this gap by making math class more like mathematics.

Tracy spent years observing a diverse set of classrooms in which all students had access to meaningful mathematics. She partnered with teachers who helped students internalize the habits of mind of mathematicians as they grappled with age-appropriate content. From these scores of observations, Tracy selected and analyzed the most revealing, fruitful, thought-provoking examples of teaching and learning to share with you in this book.

Through these vivid stories, you’ll gain insight into effective instructional decision making. You’ll engage with big concepts and pick up plenty of practical details about how to implement new teaching strategies.

All teachers can move toward increasingly authentic, delightful, robust mathematics teaching and learning for themselves and their students. This important book helps us develop instructional techniques that will make the math classes we teach so much better than the math classes we took.

Add comment December 15th, 2016

See you at NCTE 2016 in Atlanta!

annual2016We are excited to be heading to Atlanta next week for NCTE 2016. We hope to see you at Booth #405 — stop by to browse our latest titles, pick up one of our fabulous tote bags, or meet one of our fabulous authors.

Download a full list of Stenhouse authors presenting at the conference.

Author signings at our booth:

Friday:
12:30 p.m.: Kathy Short and Jean Schroeder (Teaching Globally)
1:30 p.m.: Jan Burkins and Kim Yaris (Who’s Doing the Work)
2 p.m.: Jennifer Allen (Becoming a Literacy Leader)
Cris Tovani (Talk to Me)
Ann Marie Corgill (Of Primary Importance)
2:30 p.m.: Ralph Fletcher (Making Nonfiction from Scratch)
3 p.m.: Melissa Stewart (Perfect Pairs)
3:30 p.m.: Jeff Anderson (Revision Decisions)

Saturday:
9 a.m.: Katie Cunningham (Story)
10 a.m.: Franki Sibberson and Karen Szymusiak (Still Learning to Read)
11 a.m.: Dorothy Barnhouse (Readers Front and Center)
Clare Landrigan and Tammy Mulligan (Assessment in Perspective)
1 p.m.: Ruth Culham (Dream Wakers)
Lynne Dorfman and Rose Cappelli (Mentor Texts)
2 p.m.: Jennifer McDonough and Kirstin Ackerman (Conferring with Young Writers)
3 p.m.: Erik Palmer (Good Thinking)

Add comment November 10th, 2016

Creating an online workshop with Debbie Diller

2016-03-21 09.07.33Stenhouse editor Tori Bachman gives us a behind-the-scenes peek into creating the Growing Independent Learners online workshop with Debbie Diller. The workshop is now available on our website!

By Tori Bachman
Stenhouse Editor

As we neared the finish line of editing the manuscript for Debbie Diller’s Growing Independent Learners, Debbie brought up a new Big Idea: an online workshop to help teachers really dig in to the ideas presented in the book, to show how to assemble all these pieces from standards to team planning to classroom organization to whole-group instruction, small-group differentiation, and ultimately, independent literacy work at stations.

Stenhouse has never created an online course, but as we started to research and think it through, it became more and more clear that this was a perfect book to start with.

After about a year of planning, Stenhouse video editor Nate Butler and I traveled to Houston to film the video portion of the online course. Nate has done many video projects in his career; I have not. In a way my newness was a good thing: I didn’t know what to expect, so I just paid close attention and tried not to get in the way. But in the end, I not only learned a lot about video production, I also learned a lot about Deb’s teaching philosophy, her instincts in the classroom, and her gift with children. And reflecting on the experience, I see three main points that apply both to the creation of the video and Deb’s Growing Independent Learners model:

Planning and organization are critical to success – and help you make in-the-moment decisions

Deb and I spent a full year, along with Nate and our colleagues, planning the outline and structure first, then filling in details to flesh out our vision for what to capture on film. We wrote a script for Deb to follow in the scenes in which she’s addressing the camera, along with bullet points we wanted Deb and the teachers to discuss in more off-the-cuff conversations. Nate and Deb created a shot list, and from that Nate developed a shooting schedule. We had a professional crew on site – cameraman, sound engineer, and teleprompter – to bring all this planning to fruition. We shot for three full days in two locations – Deb’s house and an elementary school in Houston. All that advance planning made the small hiccups completely manageable. We all had a clear vision and direction for the project, so we were able to make decisions in the moment, and we were able to add and take away and go with the flow. Planning! It’s critical. And a big part of Deb’s philosophy of teaching. I get it now.

There’s no substitute for a good team – in school, in the workplace, during a video shoot

A big evolution in Deb’s teaching over the years has been the critical role of teachers working together to plan instruction. We see it big time in the new book, then watch teachers planning with Deb in the online workshop. As I sat behind the scenes on the video shoot, it struck me how important our team was in the process: every person had a role and a distinct skill or strength to bring to the project. I know nothing about operating a boom mic or sound board, for instance, but James knew what every dial and knob on that board controls. It’s the same in your school, too, I’m sure: You may have a knack for teaching the finer points of writing, but your colleague really shines when it comes to breaking down mathematical thinking. You work together to fine-tune how your students learn and grow their thinking.

Kids really can reach independence – and they’ll have fun doing it – within a few months

Seeing literacy work stations in action, I have to admit, was a highlight of this past year for me. It’s one thing to read about children working independently – understanding it cognitively, seeing photos, hearing anecdotes – but my understanding and appreciation reached a whole new level as I watched first graders reading and writing together, listening to books and retelling to their partner, using academic vocabulary and pretty sophisticated language…and all on their own. Their teacher, Tracy Gilbert, taught small groups during work station time, using smaller versions of anchor charts she’d created with the kids during previous whole-group lessons.

We know these kids didn’t jump right in to independent work from day one. Literacy work stations take planning, teamwork, and thoughtful scaffolding through whole-group lessons and small-group instruction.

At the end of the three-day shoot, I returned home tired yet completely energized. This has been perhaps the most collaborative and creative project I’ve worked on – and seeing Deb in her “natural environment” in front of a room full of antsy, eager, brilliant little ones was the perfect culmination of over a year of work.

4 comments November 1st, 2016

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