See you in Orlando at ILA 2017!

2017 tote bag mockup

We hope to see you soon in Orlando during this year’s ILA conference. You will find us at booth #201 and we are excited to show off our new booth design!

Stop by to browse our titles (including several brand new ones like Strategies That Work, Third Edition; Mentor Texts, Second Edition; and Renew…), and pick up one of our new tote bags. And as always, we offer a 25% educator discount and free shipping on all orders.

Several of our authors will be available at our booth for Meet & Chats – you can see our full signing schedule below and download the full sessions schedule here.

Saturday:
10:30 – Shawna Coppola (Renew!)
Noon – Stephanie Harvey and Anne Goudvis (Strategies That Work, Third Edition)

Sunday:
9:45 a.m. – Ruth Culham (Dream Wakers)
10:00 – Stephanie Harvey & Anne Goudvis (Strategies That Work, Third Edition)
11:00- Jan Burkins and Kim Yaris (Who’s Doing the Work?)
Noon- Katrin Blamey and Katherine Beauchat (Starting Strong)
12:30 – Janiel Wagstaff (We Can Do This!)
1:00- Lynne Dorfman and Rose Cappelli (Mentor Texts, Second Edition)
2:00 – Katie Cunningham (Story)
3:30 – Brian Kissel (When Writers Drive the Workshop)

Monday:
9:30 – Steven Layne (In Defense of Read Aloud)

Add comment July 10th, 2017

A bold choice for a math methods course

When I wrote Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had, I wrote directly to readers, and I had specific readers in mind: real teachers, in various stages of their careers, who were ready to learn how to teach math so much better than how they were taught. Before writing it, I’d worked with preservice teachers and their inservice mentors for seven years in a variety of schools. I wanted to write a book that would be useful to both groups, knowing full well that some parts would resonate more with teachers who are just starting out and other parts would grab the attention of experienced teachers. I’ve been hearing from experienced teachers who are finding the book motivating, thought-provoking, and practical, which makes me so happy. I still wondered how it would go over with preservice teachers, though. Would it inspire them, or overwhelm? When Christine Newell decided to use it as the central text in her math methods class last term, I asked her to keep me posted, and we’ve had conversations throughout the semester. I’m so grateful that she took the time to reflect on her experience because it may help other math methods instructors. I have loved reading every one of her students’ letters, and it’s clear Chrissy nurtured a safe climate and taught a wonderful course. She’s started them off beautifully, and I can’t wait to hear how these teachers grow throughout their careers.

-Tracy Zager, author of Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had

A bold choice for a math methods course
Christine Newell

“I didn’t learn math this way” and “I wish I had learned math this way” have become common refrains in the professional development I facilitate. Somewhere in there is generally an underpinning of feeling totally cheated out of this “new math” that feels exciting and rich and actually makes sense. Veteran teachers are being asked to change not just the way they teach math, but their whole understanding of what mathematics is, and preservice and beginning teachers are facing the challenge of teaching in a way they were never taught. Regardless of years of experience, teachers are looking for support to become the math teacher they never had and are being asked to be. Tracy Zager’s powerful book, Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had: Ideas and Strategies from Vibrant Classrooms, is the answer to this. After my first read, it’s already dog-eared, tabbed, and annotated, and I’ve been back and forth from favorite concepts to ideas and resources countless times. This is pretty remarkable considering it was released just six months ago.

Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You'd Had, by Tracy ZagerI made the pretty bold decision to choose Tracy’s book as the required text for the Math Methods course I taught for preservice teachers this past semester. It was a departure from the content-rich texts that the other instructors were using for this course, Van de Walle’s Teaching Student-Centered Mathematics, and Chapin & Johnson’s Math Matters. To be clear, I love both of these books and find them invaluable resources as I work with teachers, but I wanted to try something different. I wanted my preservice teachers to learn not just about content and pedagogy, but also about the importance of redefining math for themselves and creating “favorable conditions” for all students to see themselves as mathematicians.

Even before the first chapter, Tracy frames the experience for readers by saying that when reading this book, “there is no wrong way, as long as reading it is useful to you.” (p. xv) This is not a trivial statement. It sets the stage for the message throughout the book that math is flexible and creative, that mathematicians explore and believe in their intuition and revise their thinking. This was new thinking for my students. Each chapter zeroes in on an important attribute of mathematicians (read: all students) and offers snapshots from real classrooms where teachers and students are engaging in math in meaningful ways. Balancing content and pedagogy is a constant negotiation for math methods instructors, and Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had offers jumping-off points for conversations around both. For my students, it was an approachable introduction to teaching elementary mathematics for this reason. It enhanced our content conversations by opening up my students’ ideas about what elementary students think and can do, and challenged what they thought was the role of the teacher.

In addition to the mathematical merits of the bookTracy writes in a way that makes you feel like you’re having a one-on-one conversation with her. Many of my students commented that they felt like they “knew” Tracy and the teachers she featured by the end of the book. This gives me hope that once they land in their own classrooms, my students will pull this resource off their shelves early and often. I’ll let my students say the rest. They were asked to write a letter to Tracy explaining the impact her book had on them in this course. The verdict? The book shaped our experience together this semester in profound, positive, challenging, inspiring ways. (Excerpts below printed with permission.)

The impact that reading your book this semester has made on my teaching has been huge. Every single chapter has given me tools, interesting scenarios, and great advice as to how I should teach mathematics in my very own classroom.

Thank you for writing such an insightful book, a book that challenged the norm and made us pre-teachers think “outside the box.”

Your book has taught me so many ways to teach math effectively but, most importantly, how to love math.

I cannot express enough how much I enjoyed each page of your book. Not only did you share such powerful and influential messages, but you inspired me.

Thank you for writing this wonderful book and inspiring teachers to feel more confident in math! It was wonderful to have read this before going to teach first grade because I feel better prepared to teach math.

Add comment June 26th, 2017

Blogstitute 2017 Coming Soon!

Blogstitute 2017

Join us again this summer for our popular Blogstitute series starting July 11 and running through August 1. We will be posting twice a week and you will hear from the following authors:
Jennifer Allen (Becoming a Literacy Leader, Second Edition)
Vicki Meigs-Kahlenberg (The Author’s Apprentice)
Katrin Blamey and Katherine Beauchat (Starting Strong)
Kristin Ackerman and Jennifer McDonough (Conferring with Young Writers)
Franki Sibberson and Karen Szymusiak (Still Learning to Read, Second Edition)
Ruth Culham (Dream Wakers)
Kathy Short (Teaching Globally)
Tracy Zager (Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had)

Sign up here to receive updates when a new post goes live and to be entered into our weekly book drawing!

We  hope to read your comments and questions on the blog and on Twitter: #blogstitute17

2 comments June 15th, 2017

The Your Turn Lesson

GOOD NEW Lynne & Diane

Diane and Lynne

The Your Turn lesson is a solid plan for instruction. Following the gradual release of responsibility model put forth by Lev Vygotsky, the sequence of instruction moves methodically and meaningfully from teacher control to student independence. (Lynne Dorfman)

In a recent post on her blog, Lynne Dorfman, coauthor of Mentor Texts (with Rose Cappelli), Grammar Matters (with Diane Dougherty), talks about how the “I Do, We Do, You Do” structure of Your Turn lessons supports students on their road to independence. Lynne and Diane regularly share bonus Your Turn lessons that you can put to use in your classroom right away:

Your Turn Lesson: The Colon

Your Turn Lesson: Using Transitions

Be sure to check their website regularly for new lessons, anecdotes from the classroom, and other tips and ideas for your teaching practice.

Add comment June 14th, 2017

Opportunities to learn with and from Stenhouse authors

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Some great opportunities this summer to meet and learn with Stenhouse authors:

  • Catch up with Jan Burkins and Kim Yaris, Christopher Danielson, Jennifer McDonough, Julie Ramsay, Jessica Shumway, Janiel Wagstaff, Mark Weakland, and Rick Wormeli at the SDE National Conference in Las Vegas July 10-14. Select from various strands based on grade level from K-2, Differentiated Instruction, or Math and find your favorite Stenhouse books at the in conference bookstore. Register on the SDE website.
  • Stenhouse authors Ruth Culham, Franki Sibberson, Pete Lourie and David Somoza, Ruth Ayres, Clare Landrigan and Tammy Mulligan, Lee Ann Spillane, and Debbie Miller will be at the All Write Institute in Indiana, June 22-24:
  • Register now for Debbie Diller’s Summer Institute in Houston, TX, July 14 & 15, focusing on “Growing Independent Readers, Writers, and Thinkers”:
  • Shawna Coppola, author of Renew! How to Become a Better—and More Authentic—Writing Teacher, will be teaching at the New Hampshire Literacy Institute summer program July 31-August 4 in Durham, NH. Her session is titled “Writing, Redefined: Honoring the Compositional Work of ALL Students.” She talks about her workshop a little bit in a recent post on the Stenhouse Blog.
    Click here to sign up.
  • Join hundreds of teachers across the country who are reading Tracy Zager’s new book Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had. The book study will continue through the summer on Voxer and Twitter.
  • Jan Burkins and Kim Yaris will be holding a six-week online class focusing on their book Who’s Doing the Work July 3-August 13. You can also catch them in person in Fergus Falls, MN on Friday, June 23:

Watch this space for new about our authors and signings during this year’s ILA conference!

Add comment June 12th, 2017

The similarities between written and visual composition

RenewIn Chapter 3 of her new book Renew! Become a Better–and More Authentic–Writing Teacher, Shawna Coppola asks teachers to redefine and rethink what it means to “write.” “Broadening our ideas about what writing “is” can be scary, as if we are opening up a Pandora’s box,” Shawna writes. “But in all reality, continuing to teach our students writers through a narrow, outdates lens–one that, in overvaluing written composition, does not accurately tell a story about the world of writing beyond most schools and classrooms–harms their development as writers by limiting the kinds of composing they are exposed to and encouraged to practice.”

Here’s Shawna with a bit more of her thinking:

In their book Teaching as a Subversive Activity, which was published in 1969, Neil Postman & Charles Weingartner write that not only have written assessments and assignments become ubiquitous in schools, but that even outside of school, “print has been the chief means of our information flow.” They go on to state that “equally certain is the fact that print no longer monopolizes man’s symbolic environment” (165).

If we were to open our favorite social media feed, or visit our favorite online news source, we would find this to be even more the case today, almost fifty years later. And yet, how many of us would argue with the fact that in today’s schools and classrooms we continue to over-emphasize (and over-value) written composition over visual composition–or even a hybrid of the two–particularly the older students get? In chapter three of my new book, Renew! Become a Better–and More Authentic–Writing Teacher, I point out the similarities between written and visual composition and make a case for renewing our writing instruction by incorporating more of the latter in our (and our students’) daily lives. I also offer a variety of ways that teachers can engage students in this work, ensuring that the writing they are invited to do in school is much more reflective of the world in which they–and we–currently live.

You can learn with Shawna this summer at The University of New Hampshire’s Summer Literacy Institute. Catch her workshop titled “Writing, Redefined: Honoring the Compositional Work of ALL Students.”  Head over to the Stenhouse website to read Chapter 3 of Renew.

 

References:
Postman, Neil and Charles Weingartner. (1969). Teaching as a Subversive Activity. New York, NY:
Dell Publishing Co., Inc.

Add comment June 5th, 2017

Now online: Renew!

Renew“Relax and enjoy an afternoon’s reflection on how to break out of rigid prescriptions and orthodoxies that limit writing instruction.”
-Thomas Newkirk, from the foreword of Renew!

Shawna Coppola’s new book Renew! is built on the premise that our students are ever-changing. While there’s nothing inherently wrong with relying on instructional strategies that have worked in the past, Shawna challenges writing teachers to rethink and revise their practice regularly.

Shawna uses a framework of Rethinking, Revising, and Renewing to examine the most pervasive educational practices in writing instruction and to help ask the questions necessary to revise them so that they are effective for all students. She goes on to examine some of the most ubiquitous practices, including what it means to write, the tools typically used to teach writing, and how writing is often assessed. She also offers ideas for how teachers can nurture their own writing lives and thus reinvigorate their teaching.

Order your copy now after previewing the entire text online!

Add comment May 15th, 2017

Happy Teacher Appreciation Week

Teaching is not just a job — it’s a profession, a calling, a passion. And it’s hard work. For Teacher Appreciation Week we asked some of our authors why they love to teach, what keeps them passionate and engaged in the classroom or while writing professional books. Watch Stacey Shubitz (Craft Moves), Paula Bourque (Close Writing), Jennifer McDonough (Conferring with Young Writers), and Katie Cunningham (Story), talk about their love for the profession.

Why do you love to teach? Leave your response in the comments for a chance to win $100 in your choice of Stenhouse books. (Please comment by Friday, May 12, 2017, to be eligible for the drawing.)

8 comments May 2nd, 2017

Which One Doesn’t Belong? Wins Mathical Award

Which One Doesn't Belong w awardChristopher Danielson, a mathematics author, teacher, and curriculum developer from Minnesota, has won the Mathical Prize for his book, Which One Doesn’t Belong? A Shapes Book.

The award will be presented to Danielson on April 22 by the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (MSRI) at the National Math Festival in Washington, DC. Danielson won the award in the Grades 3-5 category.

“For a number of years I have longed for a better shapes book,” said Danielson. “I wanted a shapes book that gives space for noticing relationships, asking questions, and thinking together,” said Danielson. “I designed Which One Doesn’t Belong? to be an invitation to a mathematical conversation.”

The book–which is intended to be used by children, parents, and teachers–features sets of four shapes with the recurring question, “which one doesn’t belong?’ Any of the shapes can be the right answer; the key is getting kids to justify their answer in their own language. The school version comes with an extensive teacher’s guide, including an “answers key” that describes one possible argument that can be made for each shape in the book. Which One Doesn’t Belong? and the teacher’s guide can both be ordered from Stenhouse.

Which One Doesn’t Belong? encourages children to use mathematical thinking to explore new concepts,” wrote the committee who awarded the prize. “The layout is brilliant and in classroom testing, children were active readers, enthusiastic to share their insights and justifications in the discussion. Perhaps the best feature is that questions have no single, simple answer!”

Danielson has worked with math learners of all ages—12 year-olds in his former middle school classroom, Calculus students at Normandale Community College, teachers in professional development, and young children and their families at Math On-A-Stick at the Minnesota State Fair. He designs curriculum at Desmos. He is the author of Common Core Math For Parents For Dummies, the shapes book Which One Doesn’t Belong?, and the forthcoming counting book How Many? He blogs about teaching on Overthinking My Teaching, and for parents at Talking Math with Your Kids. He earned his B.A. in mathematics from Boston University, his M.A. in Education from the University of Michigan, and his Ph.D. in Mathematics Education from Michigan State University.

The Mathical Book Prize is organized by MSRI in partnership with the National Council for Teachers of English (NCTE) and the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM).

Add comment April 21st, 2017

Strategies That Work – images from you

As we prepare for the publication of the new, third edition of Strategies That Work, we enjoyed seeing pictures of your well-loved and used copies of the previous two editions. The winner who will receive a free copy of the new edition is Karla Silbernagel. Here are some of the images you sent us:

 

Add comment April 17th, 2017

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