Find Your Writing Tribe – Participate in the Slice of Life Story Challenge

February 23rd, 2016

We are thrilled to have a guest post today from author Stacey Shubitz who invites everyone to take part in the Slice of Life Story Challenge starting March 1. The great thing about this challenge is that you do not have to consider yourself a writer to participate — just put one foot in front of the other, find your tribe, and start writing!

Find Your Writing Tribe. Participate in the Slice of Life Story Challenge

By Stacey Shubitz

My Dad was an Eagle Scout who still loves the outdoors. He encouraged me to start hiking when I ventured away to sleepaway camp. I used my hiking boots just once during my first summer away from home. After a day hike, I declared hiking too tedious; it wasn’t for me. I shoved my once-worn hiking boots under my bed and didn’t touch them again until I packed up at summer’s end.

During the school year that followed, my father persuaded me to try hiking again. He thought I would enjoy it. In an effort to get him off of my case appease him, I vowed to try another daylong hike. I’m not sure if was the camaraderie, the scenery, or the GORP (a mixture of raisins, peanuts, and M&Ms), but I had a good time. Even though my legs ached by the end of the day, I signed up for another day hike a week later. I was hooked by the end of the second hike. By the time I returned to camp, I committed to an overnight hike, which consisted of climbing Mt. Washington, the highest peak in the northeastern United States!IMG_3809

Climbing Mt. Washington was challenging, but beautiful. Along the way my friends and I encountered lush forests and waterfalls.

Our overnight accommodations at the Lake of the Clouds Hut were sparse, but they were divine to our group considering how tired our bodies were after climbing all day.

The following morning, we awoke early, ate breakfast, and climbed to the summit of Mount Washington, where we were treated to a view of four states, Quebec, and the Atlantic Ocean!

I was exhausted when the counselors announced it was time to go. (Truth be told: I wished we could take the Cog Railway back down, but that didn’t happen.) I struggled with the hike to the base of the mountain, but kept myself focused that I’d always be able to wear the “This body climbed Mount Washington” t-shirt I purchased at the Mount Washington visitor center.

IMG_3812I remember sitting with ice packs for a day or two once we returned to sleepaway camp. (I also have a distinct memory of the five of us kids who climbed Mount Washington using tubes of Ben Gay, which the nurses gave us when we visited the infirmary.) Despite my temporarily bruised body, I recall feeling proud myself after climbing Mt. Washington. I had tried something I hadn’t particularly liked a second time, found I enjoyed it, and worked hard to accomplish something. To this day, I’m glad I gave hiking a second chance. As a result, I’ve hiked through incredible places, like Arches National Park, Bryce Canyon, the Chilkoot Trail, Denali National Park, El Yunque National Forest, the South Rim of the Grand Canyon, Kenai Fjords National Park, the Mendenhall Glacier, and Yosemite as a young adult.

I didn’t think I could be a hiker, but after reconsidering its merits and trying it again, I found my way to it. And quite honestly, it didn’t take much for me to become a hiker. I signed up for a hike, strapped on hiking boots, filled my canteen with water, put one foot in front of the other, and was on my way to becoming a hiker. I didn’t initially think of myself as a hiker, but once I did it more and developed the persona of a hiker. (I even purchased a Camelbak so I could get the hiker look!)

It takes work to become anything you endeavor to be. Perhaps you don’t consider yourself a writer. Just as I took a second look at hiking, I want to encourage you to take another look at being a writer. I didn’t need to hike the entire Appalachian Trail in order to consider myself a hiker. I put one foot in front of the other — and did it a lot — until I got good at it and enjoyed it.

Taking on the identity of a writer is hard for some people since they feel writers are people whose names appear on book covers. That couldn’t be further from the truth. A writer is anyone who writes regularly. Therefore, the only thing standing between you and becoming a writer is you. If you tell yourself it will take time to get comfortable putting words on the page, you can be a writer. If you tell yourself you can positively impact the lives of your students by writing regularly, you can be a writer. If you tell yourself you will shut down the voices in your head that tell you you’re not talented enough, you can be a writer. It takes time and practice, but everyone can become a great writer.

Once you come to believe the world will be a better place if your voice is part of it, the next thing you must do in order to become a writer is to make writing daily a priority. I realize it’s hard to fit yet another thing – in this case making a commitment to write daily — into an already jam-packed schedule. I have blogged about ways to create a writing life that is both consistent and meaningful.

The other thing you’ll need to do to become a confident writer is to find your tribe. One way you can do this is to form a weekly writing group with your colleagues. Another idea is joining an online writing challenge, such as the Slice of Life Story Challenge, which we host at Two Writing Teachers. This is a community of teacher-writers – at varying points in their careers – who come together to share blog posts about the ordinary moments in their lives.

Here’s a step-by-step process to get you ready to take on the Slice of Life Story Challenge in March

 

The Ninth Annual Slice of Life Story Challenge begins on Tuesday, March 1st over at Two Writing Teachers. All you need to get started is your own blog – which you can start for free using blogging software like WordPress or Edublogs – and a commitment to write daily. For more information on how to participate in our month-long writing challenge, please go to https://twowritingteachers.wordpress.com/2016/01/25/join-our-writing-community/.

I am confident teachers who are passionate about writing and write regularly have students who are more confident and capable writers. I know this because I was always very public about my writing life when I taught fourth and fifth grades. I allowed my students to peek into my notebook. I shared my writing with them regularly. As a result, I knew the struggles they faced – as writers – because I was a writer myself.

Like climbing a mountain, writing is hard when one’s new to it. Even if writing has been an uncomfortable task for you in the past, I encourage you to try it again. You never know where it might lead you.

Stacey Shubitz is a Pennsylvania-based literacy consultant and a former elementary school teacher. She is the co-author of Day by Day: Refining Writing Workshop Through 180 Days of Reflective Practice (Stenhouse, 2010).  Her next book from Stenhouse, Craft Moves: Lesson Sets for Teaching Writing with Mentor Texts, will be available in the summer of 2016. She blogs at Two Writing Teachers and can be found on Twitter at @sshubitz.

Entry Filed under: Writing

6 Comments Add your own

  • 1. Carol Varsalona  |  February 23rd, 2016 at 11:22 am

    Stacey, as I read through your post I was completely immersed in the flow of thoughts that led me to introspection to connections to my daughter’s life as a hiker, and back to slice of life challenge for March. The ease of which you carried me through the piece is to be commended. This is an inspiring post sure to grab the attention of many. Thank you.

  • 2. Stacey  |  February 26th, 2016 at 4:08 pm

    Thank you for your kind words, Carol. I’m delighted you’ll be joining us again this March.

  • 3. Links I Loved Last Week: &hellip  |  February 28th, 2016 at 10:48 am

    […] signed up for the Slice of Life Story Challenge, which begins March 1. I’ve practically memorized Michelle’s 10 Tips for the […]

  • 4. Sharanjeet  |  February 29th, 2016 at 2:29 am

    Wow!
    I am inspired.
    Hope it sustains.
    Kindest wishes to you all and a lot of power to your elbow

  • 5. Tim Buchanan  |  February 29th, 2016 at 4:50 pm

    Love the enticement. I write almost daily with my students. Today I shared my “Feeling Connected” journal entry with them. I too believe that writing with students benefits us all.

  • 6. Janka Cvorivic  |  March 1st, 2016 at 8:36 am

    Thanks for sharing your slice on hiking. I enjoyed your story pattern and the traditional convention of perfect American English grammar! You immediately made a connection to readers by falling in love with something which at first you rejected. The photo made me feel as I was with you on Mount Washington and my imagination saw the cataract. Your experience was delightful to my senses!

Leave a Comment

Required

Required, hidden

Some HTML allowed:
<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


New From Stenhouse

Most Recent Posts

Stenhouse Author Sites

Archives

Categories

Blogroll

Classroom Blogs

Tags

Feeds